The DUNE Experiment: An Overview

DUNE (Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, http://www.dunescience.org) is a cutting-edge experiment collaboratively developed by the international neutrino physics community in order to further study neutrino science and proton decays. The experiment will be hosted at Fermilab (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in Batavia, Illinois and will be supported by the LBNF (Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility). It will utilize the most intense neutrino beam and largest neutrino detector in the world to study one of the strangest and most abundant matter particle in the universe – the neutrino.

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This program is an internationally designed, coordinated and funded program is currently made up of over 800 scientists from nearly 150 institutions in 27 countries and is currently projected to cost $1 billion USD. The map below illustrates the far-reaching collaborative nature of this project.

Map of International Collaboration of the DUNE Project (Countries participating are highlighted in orange)

Map of International Collaboration of the DUNE Project (Countries participating are highlighted in orange)

Experimental goals

The primary aims of the DUNE collaboration are:

  • Determine whether neutrinos have matter-antimatter asymmetry (through investigating the nature of neutrino oscillations and testing charge – parity violation) which will help scientists understand why matter generation was so much greater than antimatter generation in the early universe
  • Resolve the ordering of the neutrino masses
  • Find neutrinos beyond the three already discovered (tau, muon and electron neutrinos) such as fourth sterile neutrino, which only interacts with gravity

Site Contents
The DUNE Experiment: Overview, Goals and Useful Links
DUNE: Frequently Asked Questions
DUNE: Short Baseline Neutrino Programme
DUNE: UK Collaborations
DUNE: Prototypes and UK Involvement

Useful Links

You can read more about the scientific goals of the DUNE project at the following links: